PORTFOLIO

KABYLIE

TANMURT

Tanmurt means "the land" in the Berber language.
Kabylie, a Berber region in the north of Algeria, is the land where I was born.
I have been haunted by ghostlike, however, pleasant childhood memories ever since I have left my village. I have returned many times driven by the hope that I would find those childhood memories again. And now.... life is outplayed by death, love is replaced by hate and terror, life in the communities is gradually transforming into a life in solitude. Despite the pain and sorrow caused by this development, I still, from the depth of my heart, hope for a change to the better....

AZAWAD

THE OPPORTUNITY OF AN INDEPENDENT TOUAREG STATE

The first Touareg rebellion against the Malian army took place already in 1963. Only after many uprisings, which then took place, they obtained small concessions on behalf of the Malian government; still they were never implemented. At the beginning of 2012 the Touareg rebels of the MNLA (Mouvement National de la Libération de l'Azawad) succeeded in eventually expelling the Malian army from the north of the country and in proclaiming an independent state named Azawad.

MONGOLIA

"DZUD" MONGOLIA 2010

In Mongolia a cold spell called "Dzud" approximately occurs every seventh year. During such a "Dzud" - lasting four to five weeks - the temperature drops to under -40 centigrades, and due to that a large number of animals perish. For the normads, being fully dependent on lifestock farming, this normally means a total loss of their livelihood and drives many normads to move to Ulan Bator the capital of Mongolia. There, without education and decent job prospects, they are living a dire existence on the huge waste disposal sites of the capital. The children are frequently left on their own without school education and without a home. These street children often seek refuge in the sewage system of Ulan Bator.

BERBER IN LYBIA

DURING AND AFTER THE REVOLUTION

The death of Gaddafi awoke hopes for freedom in many Libyan tribes. This was the case especially for the Berberian tribe located in the western part of the country which has always been oppressed. Their fighters have decisively contributed to the fall of Gaddafi and of Tripoli even though the revolution began in the east of the country. However, even in the young constitution of Libya the Berberian culture and its language are not being recognised.

BERBER HIGH ATLAS

LIVING IN THE HIGH ATLAS

The Berbers or Amazigh people (i.e. free people) are the oldest inhabitants of North Africa. For thousands of years they have been living on a vast expanse of land stretching from the Atlantic coast of Morocco to Siwa Oasis in Egypt. They have their own language and cultural traditions, but their identity is under threat. They do not aspire to nationhood; some are nomadic, some are sedentary; there are Muslims, Christians and Jews. But leaders in North Africa suspect them of being heretics, and have oppressed them, breaking up communities, assimilating them and sometimes persecuting them. Every day their life is a bid to safeguard their identity.

BERBER - TOUAREG IN AGADEZ

LIVING IN THE DESERT

Between Sahara and Sahel, in the surroundings of the cities of Agadez and Abalak, in the center of Niger, live some Tuareg tribes who have chosen to resist the use of new technologies, and cultural assimilation. They are still semi-nomadic, but only move their camps twice a year and a few kilometers away, depending on the rise of the water in winter.

BERBER - ADIEU TO THE LAST LEADER

HOCINE AIT AHMED

Hocine Ait Ahmed is the last of the nine historical leaders who unleashed Algeria's war of independence on 1 November 1954, when Algeria was still a French colony. He was also the founder of the first opposition party in Algeria in 1963, just one year after the algerian independence. Ahmed was arrested and sentenced to death in 1964, escaped from El Harrach prison in 1966, and was exiled in Switzerland until 1988.

BERBER - KAMEL DAOUD

ORAN, IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF KAMEL DAOUD

“To be Algerian is to be schizophrenic”. Kamel Daoud uses these words to describe his feelings concerning his nation, Algeria. Journalist for Le Quotidien d'Oran with his twelve years old column untitled “Raïana Rakoum” (“My opinion, Your opinion”), Kamel Daoud symbolizes freedom of speech in his country.